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Chad's Rover Rehab (and turtle-speed offroad Classic build)

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#81
AdvRovr

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Yeah, tried him already, he can't get to it in time.


EDIT!!!! Just got a call from WCB right now, he says the part is on its way and will be here this around noon!!!!

Ahh, relief.

Edited by E36 Phantom, 27 August 2015 - 08:29 AM.

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Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#82
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Cool!


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#83
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Part acquired! All that stressing for nothing. Turns out that I had an interchangeable part already.....

:D

a9d0f7522ac889e4c88538fdcd52c29d.jpg

Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#84
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My wife didn't find the wedding ring vs axle shaft ring all that amusing, but I digress. :P

 

All kinds of updates this weekend. I'm going to break them into a few posts. But first, let's concluded the Project 4x4 Rover saga. 

 

Chapter 7: The End Is Never So Simple

 

I was greatly appreciative to West Coast British. I've never actually dealt with them before, and Mike seems like quite a character. I'm not sure what to think of him, but he got me the part for $9. I know that between spending time on the phone with me, ordering it from the supplier, and following up with me, he probably had a net loss on the sale, so I was glad to get it.  

 

I had just buttoned up the drivers side the day or two before, so I went into this confident that I could go from bare axle shaft to wheel mounted in about an hour.

 

HA.

 

Yeah right. With the new spacer ring on the axle shaft, I installed the CV joint and grabbed the stub axle. I seated it firmly on the CV joint and mounted it up. I turned the swivel back and forth and discovered it was binding badly on the CV joint and wouldn't turn all the way, even with the shaft pulled as far out as it would go. I pulled the stub off and realized it wasn't seating on the CV flanges. The oil seal on the stub axle was too firm and the CV joint flange was just a hair thicker than the old one, making for a horrible combination. I tried everything. I pressed hard, I clamped it, I banged on it with a mallet. Out of desperation, I took the CV back off the axle shaft, set it upright on the floor, placed the stub axle on it, and jumped up and down on it. 

 

It just laughed at me. At least it felt that way. 

 

Thankfully, I realized I had an old pair of jackstands with a hollow tube for the stand portion, and it just barely fit over the stub axle. This let me pound on it while delivering the force evenly around it. It worked. I looked at the clock and realized I spent over an hour just on the damn stub axle. *sigh*

 

The rest went very smoothly, thankfully, and I had her back together within about 20 minutes after the stub axle. She started right up very smoothly after sitting for 6+ weeks. I replaced the lug nuts with my homemade capless OEM lugnuts, and hit the road to go install my tires. I still needed to put the interior back together, but that would come later.

 

As you may remember from the beginning of this project, the primary goal was to replace the CV joint, transfer case with newer VC, and all new seals. The secondary goals were to replace the front diff,  brake pads, and inspect brake rotors, wheel bearings, and steering linkages. How did I measure up? 

 

-CV joint: done

-TC with new VC: done, but I need to do further testing on the VC as I'm concerned it's not allow enough slippage on the pavement while turning. 

-New seals: done

-Front diff: done, but it's from a D1 and I need to get a replacement from an RRC due to a couple small differences. 

-Brake pads: fronts were almost new, rears will be replaced this week

-Brake rotors: enough thickness to run until the next set of pads

-Wheel bearings: surprisingly good condition, actually. I was expecting to need to replace them, but they weren't bad. 

-Steering linkages: jury is still out, but they seemed reasonably well. Easy enough to replace that I'll handle them later if needed.

 

 

With that, I had a functional 4WD Rover, and it was time to hit the trails for some testing! Thus concludes the Project 4x4 Rover saga, and it's time to move on to a new post with this past weekend's activities and new issues to fix! Thanks for all of your help!


Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#85
GraemeWare

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-Front diff: done, but it's from a D1 and I need to get a replacement from an RRC due to a couple small differences. 

 

Chad,

 

Can you expand on this?  They should be identical, both 24 spline, and both 2" x 2 3/8" pinion drive.

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible
other assorted British pot metal ...


#86
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"The most unreliable car in the worldā€¦ is the most reliable car in the world."

 

You may recall that Jeremy Clarkson said that in reference to the Range Rover Classic on the Bolivia Special. You may also recall that Top Gear had several segments on attempting to kill a Toyota Hilux. 

 

What would happen if the two vehicles - yet untested - were to go head to head on an expedition?

 

One of my buddies recently bought a 1988 Toyota Pickup SR5. I did not know this until today, but the 80's Toyota Pickup is actually the Hilux exactly as sold worldwide. The differentiation from the ROW Hilux did not occur until the Tacoma came on the scene. He bought it with 35" tires on a 2" spring lift. Time for a trip!

 

Well, immediately after I finished the Project 4x4 Rover saga above, I set out to his office. He works at a race wheel manufacturer, so we get access to tire mounting equipment and a lift occasionally. His coworker worked on swapping the tires, gently used Cooper Discoverer ATRs in 245/75/16 E-range (31" equivalent). Meanwhile, my buddy did a quick temporary wiring job for the rack lights, and I spent an indecent amount of time trying to remove the lugnuts.

 

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Each lugnut was completely destroyed. 27mm or 1-1/16 were a touch too small, but 1-1/8" was too big, so I had to hammer on the socket on EACH one, then clamp the socket and try to hammer the lug nut back out of the socket. It was the removing the lug nuts from the socket that was so time consuming and painful. 

 

If anyone has ever had this problem, there is a QUICK and easy solution I found on one of the other forums. With the lug nuts off, take a spacer roughly 30mm long or so, and insert it into the lugnut. Hold the lug nut with a Vise Grip or channel locks, thread an M16 bolt with a 1.5 thread pitch into the nut, and tighten. This will force the cap right off, leaving you with a one piece lugnut with a 26mm head. Using an air wrench it took me about 7 minutes to remove the cap from all of them. 

 

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After all this, we headed by the store for some supplies, dropped off some things for my wife, and left Lathrop for the Sierras at....1230.....am. You know it's gonna be good when it starts like that. 

 

Our destination was Leavitt Lake, at around 9700' altitude just south of Hwy 108 and a ways east of Sonora Pass. It's about 3 miles off 108 on a trail that requires a 4WD SUV/truck. Not passable by a car or cute-ute, but also no serious obstacles beyond some decent sized rocks and 3 small stream crossings. Things seemed like they would go smoothly at first, but things are never as they seem. 

 

The Rover seemed a bit sluggish and down on power, but I wasn't sure if it was just the new tires having a bigger effect than I expected. A few miles before Strawberry, we stopped for a bio break at about 5500' elevation. I noticed an odd smell coming from the engine bay, so I popped the hood and saw a decent amount of smoke on the driver side of the engine bay coming from down low. I looked underneath and did a double take when I saw the source - the driver side motor mount. The flange above it was glowing red hot, and the motor mount itself was smoking significantly. There seemed to be some coolant on it as well. We gave it about 5 minutes to cool off, but the smoke actually seemed to be increasing, so we gave in and doused it with water. 

 

This, of course, caused unbearably slow progress for the remaining 4000', as I stopped about every 3 miles to check and make sure nothing was developing. During this entire time, the truck did seem incredibly down on power, but there were no warning lights and no coolant temperature increases. It did, however, make for some great night photography! 

 

20397738994_43a0e42f9b_c.jpgLeavitt Lake - August 2015 by James Tsukamoto, on Flickr

 

20832466808_3ce621a915_c.jpgLeavitt Lake - August 2015 by James Tsukamoto, on Flickr

 

Up some of the stretches, I couldn't even maintain 15-20mph with the throttle pegged and the transmission in 2nd, which surprised me. I had to run 1st gear for a decent amount of the steep stuff just to have any hope of making forward progress.We arrived at camp at 430am, just in time to watch the sunrise. As it turns out, Leavitt Lake is INCREDIBLY windy. It's a cool location, and just at the tree line, but it was not enjoyable for tent camping (or open air truck bed camping for him). I might go back and hunt down a spot with some trees to tie tarps as a wind break. 

 

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20994037056_20c8e6a937_c.jpgLeavitt Lake - August 2015 by James Tsukamoto, on Flickr

 

After breakfast the next same morning, we broke camp and I did about an hour of work that I still needed to finish up. Work doesn't feel like work when you're kicking back in front of an Alpine lake with your laptop. I then finished riveting the access panel to the transmission and installing the center console, and adjusting the steering stop nuts for the new tires. It was time to head out. 

 

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We headed east and stopped in Bridgeport for $4.89/gallon gas. Yes, really. 

 

I had read about some abandoned mines so we hit several miles of dirt trails along the CA/NV border in the Toiyabe forest. We went to the Chemung Mine first. I would definitely recommend checking it out. We scoped it out for a few minutes and decided to stick around and explore and take pictures. We went back to the trucks to grab our radios. I turned it on (we had been using 146.460, natch) and immediately hear some chatter about "arriving at the mine". I turn around to see a dust cloud and about 10 sharp FJ Cruisers show up. We chatted for a while, most of them were from Las Vegas, but a few were from Sacramento area. 

 

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Long set of mine photos: 

 

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We then dropped by Masonic Mine, which was interesting, but not nearly as photogenic as it had mostly crumbled away. After that, we hightailed it across some dirt trails back to Bridgeport. We had just finished making plans for dinner and to head out to a camp site on the west side of Sonora pass when we hit the pavement. Awesome! I pull away from the first stop sign and.....he doesn't. 

 

"Uh.....Chad......my clutch pedal just fell to the floor. I have no clutch."

 

Seriously? I wasn't sure whether to be annoyed that it would fail on the pavement so close to the end of the day, or ecstatic that it DIDN'T fail out on the trail. We inspected and found the slave cylinder thoroughly blown. We then noticed CV joint grease oozing from the boot, and that his passenger shock had split in two. Wow. We would have needed to drive 2 hours to Reno to get new parts from Autozone (Toyota shock, $25.99; Toyota slave cylinder, $13.50).

 

We decided to give it a shot and hopped in the Rover to high tail it up there. It had felt great all day in the dirt, but being back on pavement up a gentle (maybe 2-3%) grade it started cutting out and losing power again. I got a Check Engine Light for the first time. At that point, we didn't want to risk two disabled vehicles spread across the eastern reaches of California almost 200 miles from home. We turned around and limped back to his truck. I researched my code and found it was code 19. After some reading, I disconnected the TPS and found that it ran MUCH better. At this point, it was now too late to make it to Reno before they closed, so he gave up and called AAA.  

They said they'd be there in an hour to tow him back home, but while we were eating they called and said they couldn't find a company willing to make the long haul until morning. We had left the truck with some incredibly nice folks (and Rover owners) who let us park it in their driveway with the intent for us to work on it there. We went back and thought a bit more about our predicament, and decided that since he was in a good spot and really just wanted to go right to sleep in his truck in the driveway, I would limp home that night while he waited there for the truck in the morning. Tiredness and frustration made it seem much more reasonable at the time, but that was probably not a cool move on my part. What's done is done, though. 

 

Anyway, my trip home was pretty uneventful. It was a full moon and great weather, so the drive home was absolutely beautiful and peaceful. There was absolutely no one on Hwy 108 at 11pm - just me, nature, and the Rover. I stopped for a few cat naps on the way back, but I pulled in to home at 230am still in one piece and under my own power, so I'd count that as a success!

 

So, somehow, the 20 year old Range Rover managed to make a 400 mile expedition covering miles of offroading and two passes over 9500' elevation. It wasn't perfect, and I've got some work to do now, but the knowledge that I made it back while the unbreakable Toyota Hilux ended up on a flatbed. :D All in all, there was nothing remotely relaxing about the trip, but it was chock full of surprise and adventure!

 

Takeaways: 

-Coolant Leak

-Throttle Position Sensor

-Motor Mount issue

-Leaking oil from both ABS sensors on the front wheels despite new seals on each

-Toyota reliability < Rover reliability........ nope, can't say that with a straight face. :D

 

20833029699_df23098294_c.jpgLeavitt Lake - August 2015 by James Tsukamoto, on Flickr


Edited by E36 Phantom, 30 August 2015 - 10:34 PM.

Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#87
AdvRovr

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Chad,

 

Can you expand on this?  They should be identical, both 24 spline, and both 2" x 2 3/8" pinion drive.

 

Graeme

The casing itself is different. The RRC has shorter studs on the axle housing at the 230, 330, 830, and 930 positions, and the RRC diff has a sunken flange at those positions to get the nuts onto the studs. The D1 replacement diff does not have the sunken section, so I could only get the nuts on a couple threads which has me pretty nervous. Also, the D1 diff has a protruding mount for the harmonic dampener which the RRC did not have. 


Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#88
DHappel

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See the Turtle of enormous girth....

(Graeme seems to get all my references so I'm sure he'll explain for anybody lost )

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#89
GraemeWare

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The casing itself is different. The RRC has shorter studs on the axle housing at the 230, 330, 830, and 930 positions, and the RRC diff has a sunken flange at those positions to get the nuts onto the studs. The D1 replacement diff does not have the sunken section, so I could only get the nuts on a couple threads which has me pretty nervous. Also, the D1 diff has a protruding mount for the harmonic dampener which the RRC did not have. 

 

Chad,

 

Interesting, but I don't think it is a D1/RRC thing.  I know what you mean though since when I put the Ashcroft-built front locker in Katina we saw the opposite thing (more thread poking through the nuts, due to the milled down casing).  I'll ask about this though, as it intrigues me, and report back.

I can't picture the "protruding mount".  They always have two threaded holes (from memory).

 

Regards,

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible
other assorted British pot metal ...


#90
AdvRovr

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Sorry Don, I'm lost. 

 

 

Chad,

 

Interesting, but I don't think it is a D1/RRC thing.  I know what you mean though since when I put the Ashcroft-built front locker in Katina we saw the opposite thing (more thread poking through the nuts, due to the milled down casing).  I'll ask about this though, as it intrigues me, and report back.

I can't picture the "protruding mount".  They always have two threaded holes (from memory).

 

Regards,

 

Graeme

Do you think maybe it's early/late production? I think the D1 and P38 diffs are interchangeable, no? And I did the P38 front diff (twice.......) and recall those all being the same length, and it has the harmonic dampener. So perhaps LR used the same diff for RRC & early D1, and the same diff for P38 and late D1? 

 

The mount hangs down just ahead of the input flange on the diff a few inches for the harmonic dampener to sit. I will try to take a picture tomorrow    this week    "soon". 

 

I'd be happy to trade you my fancy newer factory genuine front diff for your old and obsolete Ashcroft diff from those outdated older models. It's simpler and doesn't have that stupid locking thing, which is just one more thing to break.

 

:P


Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#91
Guest_Pedram_*

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The series axles also have the same bolt pattern. Could be anything. Maybe even a change in front and rear diffs.

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#92
GraemeWare

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Sorry Don, I'm lost. 

 

 

Do you think maybe it's early/late production? I think the D1 and P38 diffs are interchangeable, no? And I did the P38 front diff (twice.......) and recall those all being the same length, and it has the harmonic dampener. So perhaps LR used the same diff for RRC & early D1, and the same diff for P38 and late D1? 

 

The mount hangs down just ahead of the input flange on the diff a few inches for the harmonic dampener to sit. I will try to take a picture tomorrow    this week    "soon". 

 

Chad,

 

P38 is different to the RRC/D1/D2 (although it is the same as the late 110 Defender rear from around 2002).

 

Could be a production date thing.  I have a 1995 Range Rover axle set and if I remember rightly it has the thin flange.  The D1 had the thick flange (1996) both front and rear.  From memory the RRC (1990) has the thick flange. 

 

Regards,

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible
other assorted British pot metal ...


#93
DHappel

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Oh how this makes me long for the days when I was playing with the Ford 9".  So much simpler!


Don
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#94
TigerDan

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You just need to replace the four short studs in the housing with longer ones. Very common to have to do this when using an earlier production housing with the later production diff, such as when installing 24-spline diffs in a truck which was originally 10-spline. Bill Davis at GBR refers to the different castings as "Thin flange" (earlier, short stud) and "Thick flange" (later, long stud.) The change seems to have taken place between '94 and '95 as evidenced by inspecting all the '94 and '95 RRCs currently in my driveway (two of each) as the two '94s are both thin flange and the two '95s are thick flange. So it stands to reason that Discos would also be thick flange.

 

Are you getting any leakage around the areas of the short studs? If you used a good sealant like The Right Stuff, probably not. There's usually about three threads showing on the short stud/thick flange combo, enough to get nuts just barely on but not really tight. I don't think I'd pull everything apart just to change the studs with no other problems.

Not sure what's going on with the steering stabilizer mount. As Graeme already mentioned, it's a bolt-on mount. If you removed the vibration dampener (as most people do since the trail will do it for you if you don't) then you simply bolt the stabilizer mount back on with shorter bolts. Another mod to consider is to relocate the stabilizer to the drag link in front of the axle as per Defender, which puts it higher and more out of harm's way. There are bolt-on kits to do this, or it can be easily fabbed up as I did to my '91.


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#95
Guest_Pedram_*

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I agree on the steering dampner location being put up front. I just replaced mine and took it out on the trail. First thing that got hit was the shock. Still works but after my lift and better steering links from Graeme, I relocated the dampner to the front with a dent still in it.

Have to say I haven't touched it yet since. Wish I did it before. I also reused the mount on the axle differential for the dampner to relocate it up front with a slight welded mod. Works great. No pictures I can think of. But the truck is in Sac right now.

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#96
TigerDan

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That's how I did mine...just welded the stock mount to the frame. But the mount I put on Nick D.'s truck was an RTE bolt-on, though it would be very simple to fabricate one just like it. Then, you just need a mount for the other end that clamps on to the drag link, these are readily available online (or probably even at 4 Wheel Parts) and are determined by the diameter of the bar.


Edited by TigerDan, 31 August 2015 - 10:30 AM.

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#97
GraemeWare

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..... "Thin flange" (earlier, short stud) and "Thick flange" (later, long stud.) The change seems to have taken place between '94 and '95 as evidenced by inspecting all the '94 and '95 RRCs currently in my driveway (two of each) as the two '94s are both thin flange and the two '95s are thick flange. So it stands to reason that Discos would also be thick flange.

 

Dan,

 

There must have been a period (date-wise) when they did both, since D1s (in the U.S.) ran from 1994 to 1998, and my 1996 was certainly thick flange on the front, but as you say, 1995 RRC is thin flange (my sample does, and so do yours).  I wonder what later D1s had?

 

None of this thick/thin flange is to be confused with the thick/thin flange of the axle shafts (half shafts) drive members, just in case anyone gets the wrong idea ...

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible
other assorted British pot metal ...


#98
TigerDan

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I think you misread. The '95s I have are thick flange. However, that doesn't account for repairs having been made to certain vehicles over the years. The black '95 i have is actually a thin flange in the rear, but I replaced the entire rear end in that truck with an earlier one due to a blown diff which also took out the housing so of course I discounted that and went off the front only. And the '94 SWB currently in my driveway that I'm working on has a thin flange rear housing with the short studs but has obviously had a thick flange diff swapped in at some point and the nuts just barely on the ends of those four studs.

 

All later DIs I've had anything to do with the diffs have been thick flange as far as I can recall. I wouldn't expect to find otherwise, as it does seem to have been the new standard. It's possible that some '95s (both RRC and DI) left the factory with thin flange diffs, or even a combination of the two as LR was well known for using up what they had on hand before installing the new superceded parts. This is why some '93 RRCs had 10-spline axles and some had 24-spline, and some even had both.


Edited by TigerDan, 31 August 2015 - 11:08 AM.

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#99
GraemeWare

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I think you misread. The '95s I have are thick flange. However, that doesn't account for repairs having been made to certain vehicles over the years. The black '95 i have is actually a thin flange in the rear, but I replaced the entire rear end in that truck with an earlier one due to a blown diff which also took out the housing so of course I discounted that and went off the front only. And the '94 SWB currently in my driveway that I'm working on has a thin flange rear housing with the short studs but has obviously had a thick flange diff swapped in at some point and the nuts just barely on the ends of those four studs.

 

All later DIs I've had anything to do with the diffs have been thick flange as far as I can recall. I wouldn't expect to find otherwise, as it does seem to have been the new standard. It's possible that some '95s (both RRC and DI) left the factory with thin flange diffs, or even a combination of the two as LR was well known for using up what they had on hand before installing the new superceded parts. This is why some '93 RRCs had 10-spline axles and some had 24-spline, and some even had both.

 

Dan,

 

You're right, I misread that.  The 95 axle set I have definitely has the thin on one axle, but as you say, who knows if it is original.

 

Other than being one less machining operation, and therefore cheaper, I can't see why they would go from one to the other.

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible
other assorted British pot metal ...


#100
Guest_Pedram_*

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I'm pretty sure my 95 disco has the longer studs. I can't remember running into those issues front or rear. And I have replaced both at some point.

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