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Fall Peak Bagging Trip

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26 replies to this topic

#21
DHappel

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Keep tossing out your ideas and you'll lure me in before long.  I know I'm not in shape for the plan you had originally set out for this trip.  At that elevation, with that amount of climbing, over that many days I just would't have made it.  I did OK on the little hike at Coyote Flat but that was less than 10 miles and only one day and I was only carrying a day pack, not a full weekend pack.

 

But this is just the think I need to motivate me to actually try to get some exercise instead of laying around the sofa all weekend!

 

I still need to get up to Whitney one day.  And it's not going to get any easier as 50 keeps getting closer....


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Don
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#22
astateofmike

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Awesome read and beautiful photos. 


Just enjoying my time traveling at the Speed of Adventure.


#23
Jethro

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I've never done anything like this(minus hiking in the service) but on my list...so please keep us informed as I definitely want to make it out one day.

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#24
psykokid

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For those that are interested in getting out off the beaten path, so to speak, next summer I recommend getting out and doing some physical training over the winter.  Get used to hiking, and carrying a load on your back. If you have access to mountains or hills with some elevation near you, go hike there and get to where you can do a 10 mile day without being wasted the next day. Start small and build your way up. If you dont have hills near by, still go out and hike. Another thing for those that live in an area with less than ideal topography is to do box steps. Google can explain what a box step is, but train at home with a pack weighing 20% of your body weight. Shoot for the max number of steps you can do in 10 min. Your glutes and calves will hate your at first, bit its a really good exercise to build up core strength.

 

If you don't have a good backpack as of now start searching and find some thing that fits you well. An ill fitting pack can make the most benign hike torture. Take advantage of REI used gear sales when they happen, and search craigslist for gear as well. Generally you should aim for about 20% of your own body weight as the max load you will carry. Lighter is better if you can swing it. Shoes or boots that fit well are also important. I normally wear trail runners when backpacking, even when going up steep stuff. Makes hiking so much more enjoyable when you're not wearing big clunky gore-tex boots.

 

I'm a cheapskate (I owe it to my Scottish heritage) and I've managed to put together a pretty good backpacking kit picking up stuff used when deals present themselves on craigslist, hiking and backpacking forums and discount sites. Here's a link to my normal backpacking kit which I took on the trip that Cris and I did: https://docs.google....dit?usp=sharing My base weight was around 17 lbs before food and water. If i can think of anything else to add I'll post here. If you have any questions, just let me know :)


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#25
DHappel

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I'm a big fan of trail runners (Solomans) for day hikes, but I find they aren't stiff enough for backpacking with any real weight or when on really jagged rocks.  Then I break out the boots.

 

If you haven't tried it, snowshoeing is a great way to get some exercise in the winter.  It doesn't require any special skills and you can rent the shoes.  But cutting trail in fresh powder is a workout!


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Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#26
GraemeWare

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....If you haven't tried it, snowshoeing is a great way to get some exercise in the winter.  It doesn't require any special skills and you can rent the shoes.  But cutting trail in fresh powder is a workout!

 

Also a great way to lose your Land Rover keys on Bald Mountain .....

 

Just to get back to the Rover topic ....

 

Regards,

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible, Tesla Model 3,
other assorted British pot metal ...


#27
psykokid

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I'm a big fan of trail runners (Solomans) for day hikes, but I find they aren't stiff enough for backpacking with any real weight or when on really jagged rocks.  Then I break out the boots.

 

If you haven't tried it, snowshoeing is a great way to get some exercise in the winter.  It doesn't require any special skills and you can rent the shoes.  But cutting trail in fresh powder is a workout!

 

Snowshoes are on my to buy list, as well as a decent set of crampons. I want to get out into the mountains more this winter, snow be dammed..

 

Also a great way to lose your Land Rover keys on Bald Mountain .....

 

Just to get back to the Rover topic ....

 

Regards,

 

Graeme

 

Common denominator -  we drive our Rovers to the trial head...

 

( there's your rover topic Graeme :P )


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