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Disco 1 hood louvers

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5 replies to this topic

#1
DHappel

DHappel

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In an effort to reduce under-hood temps I've taken a somewhat drastic step.  I've installed a set of louvers on the hood to let the heat out!

 

I wouldn't necessarily recommend you do this on your nice clean street rig, but for a trail rig why not?  Hey, I've always got a spare hood and some extra red paint if I decide I don't like it.  

 

I bought them from here:  www.houdlouvers.com

 

On youtube you can find a video of the owner of the company installing a set on his personal Disco:

 

 

 

 


  • lutz likes this

Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#2
DHappel

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As noted, I ordered the XL hi-flow louvers.  Installation took maybe 4 hours.  I'll get a chance to seriously test them this weekend as it's supposed to be 110* tomorrow and I'm heading for Hollister, so both interstate and trail running.

 

The video shows pretty much the installation.  Attached are some photos of my installation.

 

First, figure out where you want them-

Attached File  20170831_184904.jpg   142.1KB   15 downloads

 

Then start cutting-

Attached File  20170831_192737.jpg   140.83KB   14 downloads

 

If you have cross-braces, make like a cheese... :)

Attached File  20170831_201803.jpg   160.71KB   13 downloads

 

de-burr, mask, and paint

Attached File  20170831_214329.jpg   136.11KB   13 downloads

 

Then start riveting.  The end result:

Attached File  20170831_231148.jpg   138.22KB   8 downloads

 

Attached File  20170831_231234.jpg   139.46KB   8 downloads

 

 

A few extra pics here:

https://goo.gl/photo...7aTScBRnKdNCXy5

 

 

Some people have asked if I'm worried about water getting on the engine.  The short answer is no.  I've done water crossings; I've pressure washed the engine bay; I'm not that worried.  If I had a carb'ed motor with an open element filter I might make a water diverter.  Or if the louvers were directly above the alternator (they aren't) or the distributor (don't have one on most late-ish model vehicles).  Maybe I'm being optimistic, but I don't generally park in the open and when driving the air should be flowing up and out so I don't expect rain will get in much more than normal.  The engine should be able to stand a drip or two.  Time will tell.

 

 


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Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#3
Justin

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Wow, I'm impressed with the turn out. Looks damn good. So when do we start the sign up list for Don's help installing a pair on our vehicles?  :D


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#4
seldomwright

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So any noticeable change in engine temp?  I'm tempted to do the same, plus side vents perhaps.  Normally my truck runs art 185-190 in Oakland, but gets around 210 when climbing mountain grades in the heat such as east of Fresno to Kings Canyon, and even 215 pulling a trailer up through the Santa Cruz mountains, which I will never do again, ever.  Turning the heater on has always worked to drop it quickly back down to 190, but hood louvers look awesome!  

 

What about some sort of heat vent diverter..?.. as in flip a switch and the heat would vent to the exterior of the engine bay instead of into the cab?  



#5
DHappel

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So not a huge change in engine temps.  Perhaps 5*.  That turns out to be because Rover's thermostat is set to work in that range so it's going to try to get the motor to that temp regardless of the amount of cooling available.

 

It does seem to have reduced my under-hood temps though which is a good thing.  I didn't take any before/after measurements so unfortunately I can't quantify it.  One telling detail is that before I had 2 heat related issues that have not returned.  First, I had a starter solenoid get too hot and just fail to operate until it cooled off.  Second, I cooked a power steering pump.  Those both happened on the same trip, where I was climbing up I80 in triple digit heat with the AC on.  My engine temps weren't too crazy, maybe 215* as I recall, but the under hood temps cooked both parts.  Since the louvers went on I've not had any heat related issues.

 

I do however think the stock radiator is barely adequate to the task.  When I watch my temps in high heat driving I can see the thermostat opening to control heat, but it's apparent that high-load driving such as pulling a trailer up a steep grade at highway speed in 100* would still result in an eventual overheat.  You can argue that you shouldn't be putting that much strain on the truck in the first place but I'd argue that a properly sized radiator should be able to keep up with the heat output of the engine under any likely operating condition and clearly the stock radiator can't.  

 

Running the heater of course is effective because it's a mini-radiator complete with fan.   I suppose if you could figure out a diverter so you could duct it outside the cabin when you needed extra cooling capacity that would be great, but I have no idea how to go about that without extensive study.


Edited by DHappel, 16 October 2017 - 07:37 AM.

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Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#6
DHappel

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Here's a quote from Chad from the earlier thread:

 

Don, you have a GEMS 4.6 right? 
 
This is from the P38 RAVE since I believe the P38 is the only vehicle that got the 4.6 GEMS from the factory: 
 
"The thermostat is closed at temperatures below approximately 80 °C (176 °F). When the coolant temperature reaches between 80 to 84 °C (176 to 183 °F) the thermostat starts to open and is fully open at approximately 96 °C (204 °F). In this condition the full flow of coolant is directed through the radiator."
 
If it's not fully open until 204F, and you're pushing hard up a grade in hot weather, I don't think 215F is unreasonable or outside the design criteria. I don't see anything in the RAVE that specifies the temperature for when the gauge starts moving up from the center, though.
 
 
 
As you can see, I'm actually running in the design specs engine temp-wise.  Hence the limited change in running temps.  I do still think the stock radiator is barely adequate though and not enough for 'severe duty'.  

Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock





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