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Recovery gear and clinic

- - - - - recovery strap shackles

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#1
jlmoped

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I want to get a recovery kit plus learn how to use them.  My gear consists of a fire extinguisher, a tire repair kit and a first aid kit.  I know that is far from complete and enough to save me on the trail by myself.  So I want to expand the kit.  I have heard ARB Essentials Recovery Kit (RK11) maybe a good start as a basic kit.  Is that enough or good quality?  I have also heard Bubba Rope and soft shackles are good too.

 

The strap in the ARB kit is rated at 17,500 lbs and it is a kinetic strap.  That is about 3x the weight of the LR4, is that enough?  The Bubba rope is rated much higher (7/8" at 28,600 lbs).  Is the snatch block only use on a winch line, not the recovery strap/rope?  Since I don't have a winch, do I need that?  Do I need a conventional static strap as well?

 

Can you help me build my recovery kit?  Knowing what should be in a basic kit and what should be in a "well equip" kit will be very helpful. 

 

Will there by another recovery clinic soon?

 

Thanks,

Julian


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#2
lithium1330

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if you’re planning primarily for solo trips, I would say the kinetic rope is optional. Typically, the kinetic rope is used for one vehicle to pull another, stuck vehicle out of sticky situations. I’m not sure it will work as intended in a single vehicle recovery situation. Maybe it can be a sub-in for a tow strap in a pinch.

Depending on what you plan to get stuck in ;) you have different options for self recovery.
If in mud or sand, you can wedge in traction mats to try and drive out. If you are trying to climb over bigger rocks and boulder, a winch (or hi lift) will be helpful in pulling yourself out of those, provided you have something to anchor the winch line to, like another vehicle, a tree, ground anchor, or a buried tire. A snatch block will be useful as a way to guide the direction of pull, or double up the winch line to increase pulling power (at a slower rate). And this tool can only be used with winch rope or wire, but not straps.
And a tow strap can help extend the reach of your winch line at a more reasonable cost ($35 - $45 for strap than buying extra winch line $130+)

I’m sure others with more experience in recovery will have more to add.

Should you buy the ARB recovery kit? It’s up to you. I have sourced most of the components in that kit with generic brands from amazon for less money... Personally, I put less value in brand names for things like shackles and straps.

A bit lengthy read, but hope this helps some.
Chris

#3
GraemeWare

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I want to get a recovery kit plus learn how to use them.  My gear consists of a fire extinguisher, a tire repair kit and a first aid kit.  I know that is far from complete and enough to save me on the trail by myself.  So I want to expand the kit.  I have heard ARB Essentials Recovery Kit (RK11) maybe a good start as a basic kit.  Is that enough or good quality?  I have also heard Bubba Rope and soft shackles are good too.

 

The strap in the ARB kit is rated at 17,500 lbs and it is a kinetic strap.  That is about 3x the weight of the LR4, is that enough?  The Bubba rope is rated much higher (7/8" at 28,600 lbs).  Is the snatch block only use on a winch line, not the recovery strap/rope?  Since I don't have a winch, do I need that?  Do I need a conventional static strap as well?

 

Can you help me build my recovery kit?  Knowing what should be in a basic kit and what should be in a "well equip" kit will be very helpful. 

 

Will there by another recovery clinic soon?

 

Thanks,

Julian

 

Julian,

 

You're asking good questions, but I would say that the best way to start is with the training (as you allude to in the first sentence).  The best gear in the world won't recover you any better than a Harbor freight tow strap, and injuring yourself would leave you in a worse state, isolated on the trail.  Since you say you don't have a winch, most of that stuff won't help you.  You can use a manual 'hand' winch, but only when you have perfect conditions (anchor points, like trees, etc exactly where you need them).  The club does run recovery clinics once in while, and that would be a great place to start.

 

Regards,

 

Graeme


Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible
other assorted British pot metal ...


#4
DHappel

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I don't have enough time this morning before I have to leave to address all your gear but the guys above gave a good start.  I'll circle back around to this after work this afternoon.

 

As for recovery clinics, we did one early this year, around Feb or March if I recall correctly.  It might not be a bad idea to set up another one.  Last time we did it at Carnegie SVRA out in Livermore as part of a MORG.  I'll look at what we have coming up and see about setting up another.


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#5
DiscoDavis

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Brenton actually teaches this stuff, might try and see if he is available.

 

>17k strap is fine, you want it to stretch a bit when you use it

>bubba rope is much softer on a pull, nicer for recovering, just more expensive. your call. 

>snatch block is for winch line only, you will need it if you have a winch (doubles pulling power, good to redirect pull)
>get a few shackles, 2 min, 4 is nice

>you will need a shovel 

>max trax or treds are good for self recovery, winch and those is best. 

>hilift jack has many uses

 

That ARB bag thing has a good start, but you may just want to buy what you want separately. I don't like the orange bag thing it comes in. 


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#6
DHappel

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I want to get a recovery kit plus learn how to use them.  My gear consists of a fire extinguisher, a tire repair kit and a first aid kit.  I know that is far from complete and enough to save me on the trail by myself.  So I want to expand the kit.  I have heard ARB Essentials Recovery Kit (RK11) maybe a good start as a basic kit.  Is that enough or good quality?  I have also heard Bubba Rope and soft shackles are good too.

 

The strap in the ARB kit is rated at 17,500 lbs and it is a kinetic strap.  That is about 3x the weight of the LR4, is that enough?  The Bubba rope is rated much higher (7/8" at 28,600 lbs).  Is the snatch block only use on a winch line, not the recovery strap/rope?  Since I don't have a winch, do I need that?  Do I need a conventional static strap as well?

 

Can you help me build my recovery kit?  Knowing what should be in a basic kit and what should be in a "well equip" kit will be very helpful. 

 

Will there by another recovery clinic soon?

 

Thanks,

Julian

 

The replies above pretty much cover what I'd say.  But to address your questions specifically-

 

Is the ARB Essentials recovery kit any good?

I generally trust the ARB name for stuff like this and have some of their gear myself.  It isn't intended to be a complete kit but just the basics.  Would I recommend it?  No; I think the cost is high and at least in your case you don't need some parts.  For example, the snatch block isn't going to help you since you don't have a winch.

 

I've heard Bubba Rope and soft shackles are good.

Yes they are - Bubba Rope fills the same role as the kinetic strap in the ARB kit (sometimes called a 'snatch strap') only better.  This isn't to say the ARB strap is bad, but the Bubba Rope is softer with more stretch which makes for an easier load on the vehicles and can provide more 'sling shot' effect.  The downside is it's more expensive and takes up more room when stored since you can't just roll it up like a strap.

Soft shackles are great but I view them as an addition to, not a replacement for, regular D-shackles.  There are places they can fit where a regular shackle can't and their light weight can make them safer when say used in the middle of a rig under tension such as joining to lines or straps together (bad form to use steel shackles here), but they won't hold up well to sharp edges.  Ideally you would have some of both but if you only have the budget for one, go with D-shackles.

 

As noted, the snatch block is for use with a winch.  It is used to re-direct the direction of pull or to double the line back to your own rig and double the pulling power.  Very useful, but only if you have a winch.

 

How you build your kit depends on how you plan to use the truck and your budget.  If you expect to be out alone often a winch would be a good idea but with that comes significant cost not just for the winch but for the equipment to support it (extra rigging).  A kinetic strap or bubba rope is great but only useful if there's an un-stuck vehicle to pull you free.  If you travel in a group they are great.  Alone it's useless.  MaxTrax or similar can be very helpful in snow or sand, even mud but I find only to a limited extent.  I carry 4 MaxTrax on my LR3 and have used them mostly in snow.  BTW, there are cheaper alternatives to the MaxTrax brand but buyer beware - some are better than others.  Many people carry only 2, but if you can afford it 4 is much better.

 

There is no best answer but let's assume you'll spend some time alone and some in a group.  Let's also assume you're not going to install a winch, at least for now.  With that in mind I'd probably go with something like this

 

Shovel - not a little folding thing but at least 4' long.  It's not sexy but a shovel can solve a lot of problems with enough work.

2 or 4 MaxTrax - I'd go with the genuine MaxTrax brand

tow strap, 20-30' - this can also double as a tree strap later when you get a winch

D-shackles - 2 to start

Kinetic strap/Bubba Rope - your choice on brand; I have an ARB now but much prefer using the Bubba.

Hi-Lift jack - very versatile if you know how to use it 

(consider adding a wheel mate if you don't have good lift points on your truck)

chain with grab hooks on both ends, 15' - generally useful, and can turn the Hi-Lift into a winch in a pinch.

 

Later I'd look to add a winch.  With that, I'd add more gear.

Snatch Block - at least 1

D-shackles - 2 more

Soft shackles - 2

Tree strap, 10' (approx) - at least 1

winch extension line - 50' synthetic

 

I'm assuming you already have solid front and rear recovery points.  If not, that's step one.

 

What do I carry?  I'm not sure I can even remember all of it.

3 tree straps

50' winch extension

5 or 6 D shackles

2 soft shackles 

tow strap

kinetic strap

2 snatch blocks

4 MaxTrax (on the LR3 only, not the D1)

shovel

hi-lift

probably some other stuff I'm forgetting.

 

This does remind me that I don't have a shovel in the D1 - need to remedy that before heading to Pismo!


Edited by DHappel, 11 October 2017 - 04:41 PM.

Don
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#7
Elherbinator

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If anyone is truly concerned about recovery, then I think a winch is an absolute must and the first thing to buy. I wouldn't even be messing around with collecting other stuff before getting a winch. A winch combined with a simple kit (like the ARB) will get you out of most situations. Add a pullpal and you're ready to self recover nearly anywhere with some creativity. I no longer consider a winch optional on any offroad vehicles I own. After the first time you HAVE to use the winch, you'll never feel comfortable driving without one. So IMO you need a winch.


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Edited by Elherbinator, 11 October 2017 - 05:18 PM.


#8
DHappel

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If anyone is truly concerned about recovery, then I think a winch is an absolute must and the first thing to buy. I wouldn't even be messing around with collecting other stuff before getting a winch. A winch combined with a simple kit (like the ARB) will get you out of most situations. Add a pullpal and you're ready to self recover nearly anywhere with some creativity. I no longer consider a winch optional on any offroad vehicles I own. After the first time you HAVE to use the winch, you'll never feel comfortable driving without one. So IMO you need a winch.


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A winch is a critical piece of equipment and I know I wouldn't consider building a truck without one.  However not everybody seeks out challenges the way you or I might.  Some people just want to explore fire roads or other moderate trails and for that level of work I don't think a winch is do or die.  Certainly a good thing to have and it can make your life much easier, but there is often a way out of a stuck situation without one, particularly if you aren't pushing limits or are with another truck who can help.

 

Additionally, some people simply don't want to spend the money on a steel bumper and winch plus the associated rigging needed to make it useful.  Or perhaps they just don't like the look on their daily driver.

 

So while I consider a winch a 'must have' for myself, I don't automatically think it's a 'must have' for everybody.  The tone of the OPs post gave me the impression he wasn't looking to take on the Rubicon, so I didn't want to give him the impression that if he didn't have a winch he'd be better off staying home.  Plenty of trucks have gone plenty of places without one, you just have to be a little more careful not to get in over your head and be willing to deploy other means (like a shovel and a hi-lift - if it comes down to it you can do an awful lot with those two tools, some time, and some muscle) if you do get yourself stuck.


Don
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#9
Disco2Guy

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When it comes to recovery gear, I'm of the mindset that it's one area you don't skimp out on because of cost.

 

Buying from a reputable shop is good, but the you must always look for the WLL (Working Load Limit) as well as the Safety Factor (5:1). The Working Load Limit is the amount of load the shackle is designed to take. These are what determine the MBS (Minimum Breaking Strength) of the shackle. So a WLL 4 3/4 Ton (9500 lbs.) shackle with a 5:1 Safety Rating would have a MBS of 47,500 lbs.

 

For things like a standard screw pin bow shackle, the WLL should be cast into the shackle body. You'll get less wear on straps if the info is embossed into the metal instead of raised lettering. For a standard 3/4" shackle, it should be rated to a minimum of 4 3/4 Tons, with a Safety Factor of 5:1. The SF isn't usually found on the shackle so inquire with the seller or look up the manufacturer's website. I will only buy metal bow shackles from Crosby (made in the USA) or Van Beest (Green Pin). The individually test each shackle and rate the Safety Factor at 6:1.

 

When it comes to straps and ropes, they too should have some form of load rating information, usually in the form of a tag sewn into (or around) one of the eye loops. There are a variety of ways to use a strap; straight end to end, bridle, cinch loop, etc. and they all have different load ratings. One that is rated for 3x the GVW is good. Some people think the strongest strap is the best to get. But if it's too strong, it won't stretch enough to actually yank you out and instead you get a harsh tug. The straps usually stretch 15-20% of their length, and a KERR (Kenetic Energy Recovery Rope) aka Bubba Rope, will stretch up to 30%.

 

There are other things to throw your money at in the beginning I think. To get the winch, you'll probably need an HD bumper. To hold all that weight up front, you'll need stronger springs and shocks. That usually means additional lift so why not fit larger tires? If you're going to wheel and expect to need a winch, then by all means start with one. My philosophy for someone getting into it, is to start from the ground up. Literally. Start with the tires and add diff guards, sliders, bumpers. Protect the lowest hanging parts first. Steering components like to get all twisty too so watch out for them.

 

The best thing you can do is go out, watch and learn. See what sort of situations you see yourself getting into and the type of terrain you'll be traveling on. What gear does everyone else have? If you like sand or snow a lot, maybe an X-Jack is a better investment. Have a winch? Try the Deadman Offroad or a Pull Pal. Maxtrax are great, do you have a way to safely mount them?


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#10
jlmoped

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Thank you all for you inputs.  That is a lot of useful advise and info on products for the recovery kit.  I should have given more background information and intended use of the LR4.

 

The LR4 is not my daily driver.  I intend to use it for short to long road trips and seek out occasional dirty roads.  I am new to off-roading, so I am not ambitious in getting on advance trails.  I hope to attend more MORG where I can learn from others with plenty of experience.  If I do go out on my own, I will be cautious and stay on easy trails. 

 

So far I have the Tactical sliders and a Frontrunner roof rack, a RTT and Compomotive wheels with 265/560R18 KO2.  I have thought about a steel bumper and winch and I know that those are very good gear to have and give be the peace of mind.  But for a "on the road, road trip" vehicle, that is a lot of extra weight to carry.  I also wanted bigger tires, but then I will need a rear bumper and tire carrier, again, a lot of extra weight.

 

I may get a winch later if my skill reach the level when I will tackle more difficult trails.  For now, I figure I am more likely to get stuck while with the group, so I want to get gears that can help others to help me (similar situation as to be able to find someone willing to jump start my dead battery, but neither one have a jumper cable).  That's why I am looking for basic recovery basic.

 

I do want to invest in quality gear so I only need to buy it once.  Does this look reasonable?

- Bubba Rope, is 7/8" x 30' the right one to get?

- 2 Gator-Jaw 32,000 lbs soft shackles

- 2 metal D-rings, what rating and brand?

- Full size shovel, what shape head?  Where to get it, Home Depot, off-road store, Amazon?

- 20' or 30' tow strap, any brand and where to get it?

 

What is Wheel Mate?

 

Is anyone willing to host another recovery clinic?

 

Thanks again,

Julian


Edited by jlmoped, 11 October 2017 - 09:39 PM.

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Julian

'13 LR4 - with some extra stuff

KI6AWY


#11
lithium1330

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That's a pretty solid Christmas shopping list. 

JFYI, stores like 4wheel parts (local place) & other online places typically has sale on recovery gears around the holidays, esp. Black Friday and Cyber Monday. So, if you're not in hurry, this may give you some time to do more research before deciding on what and how many. 

 

Also, youtube has some good instructional videos on recovery gears and how they're used and not used. There is also a lot of mis-information, but most of usually helpful. 

 

something like this:


Edited by lithium1330, 11 October 2017 - 10:42 PM.

Chris

#12
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Julian,  we'll set up another recovery clinic in a few months.  Perhaps January as that looks like the best upcoming MORG.  Maybe we'll get Brenton to come along as we haven't seen him at a MORG in ages (hint hint).

 

A wheel mate is an accessory for a hi-lift that lets you lift a wheel.  It comes in handy when you don't have a good lifting point.  With your Tactical sliders you can lift directly on the slider nerf bar, and I don't know if it would fit the Compo wheels anyway.

 

As for a shovel, I prefer a pointed blade to help dig in harder conditions.  A flat spade is good for moving a lot of soft material like sand or snow but won't work in hard pack dirt.  I carry one of these:

https://www.amazon.c...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

But you can easily find something at the local home center that will do the job.  There's no need for anything exotic here.  In fact, a typical long handle garden shovel will work just fine if you have the room for it.  I do prefer a non-wood handle just because I leave mine on the roof rack exposed to the elements.

 

The reason I recommend a long(er) handle and not one of those little folding e-tools is so you can reach under the truck if it's high-centered.  Plus the bigger head will just make moving material that much faster.  

 

On the tow strap, you can find something at Amazon or stop by a 4WheelParts store.  As Brenton suggested, it's a good idea to check the load rating.  I remember not so long ago I broke a cheap Harbor Freight strap (using it as a tree strap) trying to drag my LR3 out of a deep hole in the snow.    One thing to avoid is metal hooks.  It should just have sewn in eyes.  Hooks = bad.  You can buy a name-brand like ARB, or you can go cheaper.  I have one of these:

https://www.amazon.c...words=tow strap

 

The gear you listed is all good stuff.  I don't have a specific name to recommend for shackles (I have a mix myself) but the ones Brenton mentioned are top-of-the-line.  You may not need the soft shackles but they take up little room and can come in handy.  


Edited by DHappel, 11 October 2017 - 10:30 PM.

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Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

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#13
DHappel

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That's a pretty solid Christmas shopping list. 

JFYI, stores like 4wheel parts (local place) & other online places typically has sale on recovery gears around the holidays, esp. Black Friday and Cyber Monday. So, if you're not in curry, this may give you some time to do more research before deciding on what and how many. 

 

Wow, I hope he's not in curry.  I can't stand the smell of that stuff!

 

I've over-used my cell data and Verizon (unlimited my a$$!) has throttled my speeds to a crawl so I can't see the video you posted.  Is that Ronnie Dahl?  He's generally a pretty good choice for how-to videos.


Don
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'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#14
lithium1330

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Well, spell checker said curry was spelled correctly... so, I don't see anything wrong. ;)

 

Yeah, it's a RonnyD video. 


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Chris

#15
DiscoDavis

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- Bubba Rope, is 7/8" x 30' the right one to get?

- 2 Gator-Jaw 32,000 lbs soft shackles 

- 2 metal D-rings, what rating and brand? 4.5T minimum rating Van Beest or something from viking offroad

- Full size shovel, what shape head?  Where to get it, Home Depot, off-road store, Amazon? One word: Carters 

- 20' or 30' tow strap, any brand and where to get it? honestly tractor supply or something way overrated weight wise.

 

What is Wheel Mate? - it is an attachment for a hilift, 2 grabby arms so you can lift the wheel up off the ground.

 

 

Definitely get a shovel asap. Probably the most useful. In a pinch a surplus E tool from literally anywhere would work. Carters is just made for the exact digging you will be doing. 


Edited by DiscoDavis, 13 October 2017 - 01:30 PM.

:lr:

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