Jump to content

Welcome to NCLR - Northern California Land Rover Club
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

Camping gears (stove and table)

- - - - - stove table

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1
jlmoped

jlmoped

    Navigator

  • NCLR Club Member
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • San Jose, CA
  • KI6AWY
  • 2013 LR4

Now that Serine and I have done a couple camping trips, we want to get more/better camping gears.

 

Things we found didn't work well for use are:

1. Coleman double cooktop propane stove: too big, we only use it to heat up water and light cooking.  Need to get a single stove

2. Folding table: it is light, but doesn't pack well.  It folds up in a square shape, take up too much room.  Need something more compact

 

So we have 3 requirement for stove:

1. compact

2. use propane install of Butane.  (besides cost of fuel, is there an advantage with propane?)

3. heat up water fast and light cooking

 

For table: table-top can roll up and legs can pack in a roll.  I found items with big surface area takes up a lot of room and they don't stack well and difficult to tie down.  Items that are long and narrow are easier to pack.

 

Will something like this work well?

Stove: https://www.amazon.c...PJDTCRZVL&psc=0

Propane adapter: https://www.amazon.c...PJDTCRZVL&psc=0

Roll up table: https://www.amazon.c...camp+table&th=1

 


Julian

'13 LR4 - with some extra stuff

KI6AWY


#2
DHappel

DHappel

    NCLR Trip Ambassador

  • NCLR BOD Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,154 posts
  • Walnut Grove, CA
  • KK6TBH
  • '07 LR3 with stuff
  • '96 D1 Roadster
  • '94 RRC
  • '96 D1

If all you want is to heat water it's hard to beat a jetboil.  But they aren't much good for cooking over.  I have two different size pots, a 'normal' and the 'sumo'.  When traveling solo or hiking I'll take the normal one and when with Michele I take the bigger Sumo pot.  The other issue with them is you won't be able to use propane, but I find the fuel lasts a pretty long time so my costs aren't very high.  I tend to buy the bigger bottles for Rover camping with the Sumo pot and just store them in the pot, then store the burner in the top of my food box.

https://www.rei.com/...-cooking-system

 

If I actually want to cook, I splurged and bought the Genesis stove.  
https://www.rei.com/...-2-burner-stove

I like the way it stores in it's own large pot/pan combo and it runs on propane.  You can even get an extension for it to run a regular Jetboil from it as well to make 3 burners - I've never bothered as I don't cook that much.  It's been very nice to use - one of the biggest complaints about camp stoves is that they don't simmer well because of poor gas regulation.  This one does a pretty good job at that.  However it's a bit much for just heating water.  Even when I have this with me I usually bring the smaller Jetboil too for making coffee and oatmeal in the mornings or hot chocolate at night.  

 

I see since I bought mine they have introduced a smaller single-burner version called the Half-Gen - If I were doing it again I think I'd go that route just because I never cook enough to need 2 burners (might have done it once) and it would cost less and take up less space.  The only downside is it only includes the pan and not the pot, though to be honest the pot is bigger than I need most of the time and I'm sure it's available separately.

https://www.rei.com/...-cooking-system

 

They also have this guy which I haven't seen but find very interesting:

https://www.rei.com/...-cooking-system

 

And a larger version:

https://www.rei.com/...-cooking-system

 

Of those two, the smaller millijoule looks more intriguing to me.  In fact, I'm wishing I had seen it during REI's bi-annual 20% off sale as I think I'd have bought one to try out.  I like that the pot doesn't have to stand on top of the fuel tank which will make it more stable if you're not on level ground.  And having the fuel tank upside down will likely help when it's below freezing out when fuel flow can be an issue.  I also like that it's smaller than my Genisis system and includes a pot.  It will also work with regular Jetboil pots and pans so my existing stuff will work with it.  

 

MSR, Primus, and SnowPeak are all well respected brand for small lightweight stoves as well, but I don't know their models very well.

 

Note that with the adapter you linked most stoves that run on iso-butane will run on the bigger propane cylinders just fine, though you may have problems at high altitude or very low temps.  If you google it, you'll find that iso-butane is really pretty much the same thing as regular propane but has a small percentage of other gasses mixed in to help in those situations.

 

Although the stove you linked is very cheap, I'd hesitate to buy it.  It seems like these things are often very finicky to use and though it may be great I'd expect the cheaper versions to be a little more trouble.  

 

For a table, I use this REI one and I've seen lots of other people have them as well:

https://www.rei.com/...camp-roll-table

 

I like it quite a bit; it's light and fairly compact.  Stored size is 7.5x5.5x28"  It's also pretty sturdy when set up.  Of course it costs more as an REI product but there are cheaper retailers who make knock-offs.  The ALPS table you linked would likely be fine too, but looks like it stores larger, and I've seen others that look basically the same though I don't know the brands.  One good thing about REI is you can walk into the store and play with one to see if you like it.  It does cost more to shop there but the staff are actually helpful and they have a generous return policy.


Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#3
Elherbinator

Elherbinator

    Navigator

  • NCLR Club Member
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts
  • San jose
  • Discovery 2
I'm in the same boat as Don when it comes to cooking. I keep it pretty simple with a jet boil as far as boiling water goes. It is super compact and simple and also efficient. It boils fast and the fuel lasts a long time. They also come with an attachment that allows you to use it as a regular backpacking stove. I've actually never used the attachment, but it should work fine for small pots and pans. I also have a small marine (magma Catalina) bbq I sometimes carry and a skottle. Those are nice, but can be awkward to pack. We usually carry one or the other depending on what we want to eat. When room is an issue we will sometimes just wrap up some meat and veggies in foil and literally just throw them on the fire. It is a huge space saver and very fast and easy. We just prep before we leave and throw them in the fridge. We will usually include some steak, potatoes, carrots, and onions. Pre boiling the potatoes is helpful when using this method as they usually take a lot longer to cook than the meat and carrots.
Kamp-Rite Kwik Set Table, Silver https://www.amazon.c...p_ZBoBBm8FaJidK
Here is the table I use. It's a little bigger than the one you posted, but pretty similar. This one folds up easy is ends up a similar size to most foldable camp chairs which makes it easy to stack in the car.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

#4
AdvRovr

AdvRovr

    NCLR Treasurer

  • NCLR BOD Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,321 posts
  • Lathrop
  • K6ADV
  • 97 Range Rover 4.0

Skip the Amazon knock-offs: I checked out a few of the knockoffs and the difference in quality was VERY significant holding them side-by-side.

 

I have an MSR PocketRocket (yes, really, it's a stove...) that I use when the kiddos aren't with us and we're not doing fancy food.  That kind screws on to the top of the fuel canister so the canister forms the base, so the stove takes up almost no room. MSR also makes ones that are like the one you pictured, and also like the Jetboil designs as well. 

 

The downside to the Jetboil design is that you're locked into using their pot since it latches on. I have a basic pot set with a range of sizes, which is very useful when you have more than one item cooking or more than one person. The PocketRocket is small enough to sit inside the pot set along with the fuel canister, so it takes up no room and is more flexible. 


Chad // Instagram: @AdvRovr
2009 Range Rover Sport // 2001 BMW 330Ci // 2000 Toyota Land Cruiser // 1996 Triumph Tiger 900

FOR SALE: Built 1997 Range Rover 4.0 // 2006 BMW 330i 6MT 


#5
foster

foster

    Navigator

  • NCLR Club Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Berkeley, CA
  • 2006 LR3

I also use the REI roll-top table. It's awesome, but it'll pinch your fingers if you aren't careful. I think that's more of a 'me' problem, though... 



#6
Elherbinator

Elherbinator

    Navigator

  • NCLR Club Member
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts
  • San jose
  • Discovery 2

Skip the Amazon knock-offs: I checked out a few of the knockoffs and the difference in quality was VERY significant holding them side-by-side.

I have an MSR PocketRocket (yes, really, it's a stove...) that I use when the kiddos aren't with us and we're not doing fancy food. That kind screws on to the top of the fuel canister so the canister forms the base, so the stove takes up almost no room. MSR also makes ones that are like the one you pictured, and also like the Jetboil designs as well.

The downside to the Jetboil design is that you're locked into using their pot since it latches on. I have a basic pot set with a range of sizes, which is very useful when you have more than one item cooking or more than one person. The PocketRocket is small enough to sit inside the pot set along with the fuel canister, so it takes up no room and is more flexible.

The jetboil comes with a stove attachment that allows you to use as a regular backpacking stove so you can use other pots and pans instead of just their cup or pot.b5c51d345d163f25cbef139250271ebf.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by Elherbinator, 04 December 2017 - 02:09 PM.


#7
lithium1330

lithium1330

    NCLR BOD Member

  • NCLR BOD Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 525 posts
  • San Jose
  • KM6FDG
  • Defender 90 NAS #0032

To figure out what stove to get, I think you should first ask what you typically/most often cook while these trips. 

 

If you typically do the ready-made/ready-to-eat meals (Mountain House-type, or cup ramen)... a jetboil will be perfect. Boil water, pour water into pack, wait few minutes... bon appetit! It's great for making tea/coffee quickly in morning also. On other hand, if you like to make camp dinner (bacon, sausages, chicken, or a juicy steak with a side of asparagus)... you'll want a stove that can hold up a 10 - 12" skillet. Dual burners will also be useful because you can cook the meal on one burner and soup on the other, esp on those colder nights. With a single burner, you have to choose what to cook & eat first, or risk a dish getting cold.

 

If the dual burner stove is too big, you can go with a single butane stoves. They're self-contained and smaller than dual burner. Some even offer dual fuel (accept butane & propane)... like this: https://www.amazon.c...4?ref=ast_p_ep 

Backpacking stoves (the pocket rocket or one you linked) are OK... they're great for backpackers... but IMO, backpacking stoves do not make very good car camping stoves,... just as a RTT makes a horrible backpacking tent. ;) 

 

When I car camp, I bring a jetboil (Jetboil Flash is popular) - I opted for Zip for $50. And also bring Primus dual burner stove, and pair that a 10" carbon steel skillet and small pot. When I backpack, I carry jetboil b/c I live primarily off ramen for dinner and hot tea for breakfast. 

 

Happy shopping! 


  • RedRover and Jethro like this
Chris

#8
psykokid

psykokid

    SCLR Club Member

  • SCLR Club Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 495 posts

I've got two propane stoves I use when car camping - A century stainless steel dual burner jobber I picked up years ago at a REI used gear sale for dirt cheap and a coleman single burner which packs away pretty well. Here's a link to the single burner jobber i have: https://www.coleman....2000020931.html If we're doing a lot of cooking while base camping and heading out for day trips I'll normally bring the dual burner stove and sometimes I'll bring both. If we're going moving a lot and doing a lot of one pot dishes or cooking with charcoal and/or a dutch oven as well we'll take the single burner coleman. 

 

I normally have my backpacking stove in a cook set with a 230g canister in the truck as a just in case. That stove is a Soto Windmaster and I LOVE that stove. One of the best backpacking stoves I've used (and I've got quite the collection) It sits in a Snow Peak Trek 900 most of the time when it lives in the truck. Good for stopping and boiling some water for lunch or coffee on the go without having to break out the whole kit and caboodle for the bigger stoves.

 

As far as a table I have the now discontinued Kelty Deluxe Roll top table. Been pretty good, picked it up used on craigslist for $20.00. Alps makes some decent roll up tables as well - if you are affiliated with boy/girl scouting in one way or another you can sign up with hiker direct and get good discounts on most of Alps' stuff.



#9
cjohanson

cjohanson

    Navigator

  • NCLR Club Member
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • San Francisco
  • 2002 Discovery II
  • Someday - '67 IIA 88

Not the cheapest option but I have one of these tables and I think it is a great compromise of folding up pretty small but being VERY solid (some of the roll tops are flimsy and anything with a fabric top is useless for cooking).

 

https://www.amazon.c...-bin:5894001011


  • RedRover and Mr.BlueSky like this

Chris Johanson

cjohanson1234@yahoo.com


#10
jlmoped

jlmoped

    Navigator

  • NCLR Club Member
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • San Jose, CA
  • KI6AWY
  • 2013 LR4

Thank you for all your recommendations,  I ended up with a cheap $23 Amazon camp stove with windshield and a MSR Wind Pro II stove.  I tested both by boiling 56oz of water.  The cheap stove took 10 minutes 52 seconds.  The MSR took 10:45.  The home stove took 10:25.  So there is really no difference in boiling time.  Cooking food with either camp stoves was fine, no hot spot in the middle that will burn food.  So I am happy with either stove.  Now I have a main stove and a backup stove.  I haven't decided with I should get the ISO/Butane to propane adapter to hook up the Coleman 1LB green propane to the camp stove.  I am sure that will void the warranty.  Besides cost of fuel, is there a good (or bad) reason to use propane on those small camp stove?

 

I haven't bought a table yet, but I will likely go with the REI roll up square table, it is a good size, but it seems to take a quite few steps to set up it.


Julian

'13 LR4 - with some extra stuff

KI6AWY


#11
DHappel

DHappel

    NCLR Trip Ambassador

  • NCLR BOD Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,154 posts
  • Walnut Grove, CA
  • KK6TBH
  • '07 LR3 with stuff
  • '96 D1 Roadster
  • '94 RRC
  • '96 D1
The table isn't to bad to assemble.

On propane vs iso-butane, about the only thing I can think of is cold weather or high altitude performance. Straight propane won't do as well under those circumstances. Iso-butane is mostly just propane anyway, with some other gasses mixed in to help those situations.

Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#12
DHappel

DHappel

    NCLR Trip Ambassador

  • NCLR BOD Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,154 posts
  • Walnut Grove, CA
  • KK6TBH
  • '07 LR3 with stuff
  • '96 D1 Roadster
  • '94 RRC
  • '96 D1
Hmmm... I may need to amend my statement. Looks like straight propane should vaporize easier than iso-butane, which is better than straight butane. All are a form of LPG. Propane does require a heavier canister but that's of a sorry for us

I do know I've had problems winter camping where propane wouldn't work even with full bottles.

Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users