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Rotate full size spare tire?

- - - - - tire rotation spare tire

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#21
DHappel

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Can you add "late model" to that please?

Regards,

Graeme

Ah, yes.  Talking about an LR4 and I didn't think about the earlier trucks.  Correct sir.

 

I suspect Chad is right about excess powdercoating on the wheel.  If you wanted to be particular, you could mic the inside of said wheel and see what it actually measures out at.  Perhaps a little work with some sandpaper would give a touch of clearance, Clarence.


Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

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#22
jlmoped

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I gave it another try today, and success!  After drinking some WD-40 and some persuasion, the wheels finally decided to come off.  I did noticed the tire store torque the wheel lugs on super tight, way higher than 98 lb ft.

 

All the wheel hubs have dirt/stuff built-up in them, so I think that's why they stuck to the brake rotors.  I used sand paper to lighter sand them off and the wheels mounted back on the truck without issue.  I opted not to put any anti-seize compound on them in case that will cause the dirt built-up later.

 

My small floor jack couldn't raise the truck high enough to lift the wheel off the ground, so I used the Land Rover scissor jack.  But I guess it wasn't designed for frequent use.  While raising the truck I heard some metal cracking sound.  I thought it was the frame or jack flexing, but while raising the truck to change another wheel, the bearing in the jack cracked and popped out.  Has that happened to anyone before?  Is the OEM scissor jack serviceable or I have to replace the entire jack? (2 photos below)

 

I have noticed clunking noise from the drive rear area for some time, while removing the wheels and installing the lift rods, I noticed the compressor air line was touching the brake line, so I bent the brake line slight upward, will check if the noise goes away when I take it on a test drive later (before and after photos).

 

Thank you to everyone who gave me inputs to rotate my tires.

 

 

Attached Files


Julian

'13 LR4 - with some extra stuff

KI6AWY


#23
DHappel

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Those jacks are pretty crappy.  I remember braking the one from my LR3 the first time I used it in my driveway when my truck was stock.  

 

It's important to have a jack with you that can get a wheel off the ground in case you get a flat but man are those things poor.  I'd much rather have a small cheap bottle jack.

 

The key to lifting a wheel off the ground is to lift the suspension instead of the body or frame.  That can be difficult on the LR4 because the suspension arms don't have a lot of flat spots to place a jack.  I've done it, but you have to be careful so the jack doesn't slip. 

 

As for home-use jacks, if you have the space to store it I can actually recommend one of the inexpensive Harbor Freight jacks.  They're cheap but pretty decent quality.  I've had one of these for several years:

https://www.harborfr...pump-62584.html

 

It's heavy though so unless you can leave it in the garage you won't want to lug it around.  I also have one of the 1.5 ton aluminum jacks which was good for cars but a bit too light-duty for my Rover.  I actually killed one trying to lift two wheels off the ground at the same time.  

 

For a bottle jack, the key is finding one that's short enough to get under the control arm.  They have a pretty tall minimum height and a fairly limited lifting range but they are cheap and powerful.  For $20 you should be able to buy one just about anywhere that would do the job.


Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

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#24
jlmoped

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I checked eBay for the OEM scissor Jack, $90+! 

 

Where is a good/safe place under the suspension to lift the truck with a bottle jack?  Is the control arm steel or aluminum?  How about this bottle jack and stand combo with 18-3/8" lift: https://www.amazon.c...ottle+jack&th=1

 

I have put the floor jack, OEM scissor jack and jack stands under the Tactical Rover rock slider, is that a safe place to lift the truck?  If I get a Hi-Lift jack, can I lift the truck using the nerf bars?  Is that safe to use on a regular/non-emergency basis?


Julian

'13 LR4 - with some extra stuff

KI6AWY


#25
DiscoDavis

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The OEM old red land rover bottle jacks are my favorite. 

 

Second to perhaps the 6 ton craftsman bottle jacks. Those are cheap at sears, but not covered under typical craftsman warranty. YMMV


:lr:

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23669857085_fe30f0934c.jpg


#26
DHappel

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I checked eBay for the OEM scissor Jack, $90+! 

 

Where is a good/safe place under the suspension to lift the truck with a bottle jack?  Is the control arm steel or aluminum?  How about this bottle jack and stand combo with 18-3/8" lift: https://www.amazon.c...ottle+jack&th=1

 

I have put the floor jack, OEM scissor jack and jack stands under the Tactical Rover rock slider, is that a safe place to lift the truck?  If I get a Hi-Lift jack, can I lift the truck using the nerf bars?  Is that safe to use on a regular/non-emergency basis?

Yes, the sliders are plenty strong to lift the truck by.  I often lift mine by them.  In fact, my LR3 is sitting about 5' in the air currently on my lift supported on the sliders.  I do try to place the lift pads directly under the main mounting bolts or frame where possible to help distribute the load.

 

The control arms are steel and can be good lifting points if you can find a flat spot to lift from.  That's the hardest part.   And if using a bottle jack it can be hard to find one short enough to fit under the control arm if you have a flat tire.

 

A hi-lift can pick the truck up high enough to change a tire by lifting on the nerf bar of the sliders, but it's not a very good option if you have other choices.  It still makes you lift the truck quite high as you are lifting through the suspension travel before the tire comes off the ground.  And a hi-lift jack is inherently unstable (by design actually).  A very useful and versatile tool on the trail but not something I use for maintenance or around the shop.

 

I definitely would not spend $90 for a factory scissors jack!  They are nothing special; pretty poor actually.   There are tons of options for the same thing at far lower prices:

https://www.amazon.c...s=scissors jack

 

A basic bottle jack is cheap and fairly safe, but likely won't have enough lift to pick a wheel off the ground unless you can get it under the suspension.  The one you linked with a built-in jack stand is nice, but the problem with it is how tall it is full collapsed.  It definitely won't go under the suspension!  It's also too bulky to carry in the truck daily.

 

The OEM RRC/D1 (D2?) bottle jacks are great - they are double-acting so they have more lift than a normal bottle jack.  they're also somewhat hard to find in working condition.  

 

I don't know if you have a garage or are in an apartment.  If you have a garage and place to store it, a floor jack like I linked in my earlier post is the preferred method of lifting, followed by placing a jack stand under the vehicle once it's in the air.  For a trail tool, I'd consider a hi-lift since it can do many things.  But for just a daily 'in case of flat tire' jack, I'd probably either get a small bottle jack or another scissors jack since they can be stored in the stock location, are cheap, and can do the job.  

 

In my personal Rovers I only have hi-lifts.  These are not daily drivers and I'm comfortable using the high lift (with a strap around the axle) to change a tire if I need, even on the side of the road.  But I certainly wouldn't expect Michele to be able to do that and I don't know if you'd want your wife using a hi-lift - for that matter if you haven't used one before I'd recommend you do some research on how to use it before trying.  It's easy to damage the truck or hurt yourself if you're not careful.  There are tons of youtube videos on using one but if you'd like I can run though it with you at the next MORG.  We can actually lift your LR4 with one so you can see the pros and cons.  We can also look at other good lifting options using your specific truck.   There are lots of ways to skin this particular cat.

 

I'd offer to take some pictures of mine, but it's stuck on the lift in the shop for at least a week waiting on some new parts.  :(


Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

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#27
DHappel

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I've never really given it any thought, but I suppose not everybody 'just knows' how/where to lift a vehicle.  Many of us learned it as kids hanging out in the garage with our dads, or by trial and error (and I bet a lot of us have mishap stories that almost ended in disaster).  We covered some basic hi-lift use during the recovery clinic at the last MORG, but I'll be happy to bring a few different jacks along at the next MORG and demonstrate different ways to lift the truck if you'd like.  Of course people are welcome to come by my place any time I'm here, but it's a bit of a haul just to play with some jacks!

 

Funny side-story - last week I had to use a small bottle jack to lift an engine in a boat so I could remove a motor mount.  The engine probably weighs around 1200 lbs and I only needed to lift it a tiny bit to take the load while the mount was off, but it was still pretty sketchy since there's such limited access in the bilge and of course the bottom of the boat is slanted.  (V-hull)  I had no problems, but boy was I nervous the whole time the jack was holding the engine up.


Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

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#28
Elherbinator

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I checked eBay for the OEM scissor Jack, $90+!

Where is a good/safe place under the suspension to lift the truck with a bottle jack? Is the control arm steel or aluminum? How about this bottle jack and stand combo with 18-3/8" lift: https://www.amazon.c...ottle+jack&th=1

I have put the floor jack, OEM scissor jack and jack stands under the Tactical Rover rock slider, is that a safe place to lift the truck? If I get a Hi-Lift jack, can I lift the truck using the nerf bars? Is that safe to use on a regular/non-emergency basis?

I carry a similar bottle jack / stand combo. It works great for lifting under my solid axles. I have a hi lift, but avoid using it if I can. The minimum height of the combo jack is around 11" I believe, so you would have to have some pretty big tires to make it work with IFS. It also has a relatively wide base, which is nice on trail, but you can't get it as close to the tire as you might with just a regular old bottle jack. Not really an issue for a solid axle tho. For anyone with solid axles I would recommend this bottle jack/ stand tool for removing tires. I have used it many times on tires up to 42". A hi lift is ok if that's all you got, but it's a hassle and, depending on your suspension droop, it may not work. On my old 4runner, I pretty much had to max out a 48" hi lift to get a rear tire off the ground and I wasn't running coilovers or anything, just some 63" Chevy leafs. It was just annoying to use and less stable than the jack combo. With the wide base and minimal lifting required, it feels super safe. You may not run into many people using it on trail, but trust me that it works and works well for removing tires on trail.


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#29
Elherbinator

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I also use it to level my Tahoe when I sleep the back while camping. I don't lift the wheels off the ground, just take a little weight off the suspension. The pictures shows it can extend pretty far. May be useful for you RTT guys. dcb56f0a8b578ec13ea2da829ed7231a.jpg


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#30
DHappel

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Yeah, it's certainly easier to lift a solid axle truck!  Just slide the jack under the axle tube and good to go.  The IFS/IRS stuff is a bit trickier. 

 

I recall trying to change a tire on Erin's LR4 maybe 2 years ago.  We had a bottle jack on hand but with the tire flat we couldn't get it under the control arm (too tall) and of course it didn't have enough lift to get the tire off the ground from the slider or frame.  I think we ended up using a factory scissors jack from somebody else's truck since they collapse so flat you can get them under almost anything, but boy are they cheap and not for every-day use.


Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

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