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Gaia GPS - Harwdare Options?

- - - - - GPS tablet Gaia

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25 replies to this topic

#1
PaulD

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Hi Gang,

 

This is the year I want to get serious about detailed navigation. I have limped along with my entry-level Garmin Nuvi to "get me there," but for off-road travel, I am ready to do the Gaia thing. I know Don H. has a good system and I think that would work for me. Seems like an external GPS antenna is the way to go to provide the best signal input.

 

So what are people using?

 

Thanks in Advance,

 

Paul


'93 LWB
2" RTE Springs, GDE w/8K winch, Disco axles, Viair, Dura-Tracs, & Asst'd grille badges

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#2
PaulD

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Hardware, Duh!


'93 LWB
2" RTE Springs, GDE w/8K winch, Disco axles, Viair, Dura-Tracs, & Asst'd grille badges

12e11964-24f6-4630-a08f-5758456bc143.jpg


#3
Disco2Guy

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I've used my iPad Mini (2nd Gen), for years and never really had a problem. There have been a couple times when it took a while to find enough sats to get a lock, but no matter where I've been, tracks have been recorded. That's off road. Since the Mini is on the Sprint network, getting a signal on the highway can be more of a pita, so I usually use the iPhone on Verizon for that part of the trip. But, both units carry the same tracks for the trip as a backup if something goes wrong.

 

If you're looking for dedicated hardware, you want something that supports GPS satellite as well as GLONASS (the Russian version of our GPS system). Some devices will predict where the satellites should be to make it faster to find them next time it's used, like if you turn the unit off overnight. Usually it seems they can predict up to a couple days. It will search where it thinks the satellites should be in the sky. This works well if you're among tall trees with a limited view of the sky. Things like deep canyons can always be an issue as well.

 

Other things to consider are ease of uploading and downloading your tracks. I like to plot tracks (or possible tracks) in Google Earth and then convert them to the .gpx format on gpsvisualizer.com. Gaia has an online account that acts as your hub and should sync automagically to your devices. Something else to consider are the type of (image) tiles you can save (or cache) to the unit. I like to mix between USGS Topo and satellite views. This however seems to be hit and miss, but I think it depends on the connection. It seems the cached tiles won't always load if there's a hint of a signal. When it's showing Extended1x (lower than LTE and 3G) it doesn't always want to load the tiles. But, there's always the track loaded and your current position tracked, so you can still navigate with just a grey background, or blurry image tiles. This doesn't happen often but is something to keep in mind.


Edited by Disco2Guy, 01 January 2018 - 02:19 PM.

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Brenton Corns
TREAD Lightly! Tread Trainer
 

4xFarAdventures.com
 

2001 D2

205,000 miles

 

post-472-0-05786100-1439104512.jpg


#4
lithium1330

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Paul, 

 

I have a ipad mini 3 (wifi) 16GB RAM paired with a Dual GPS 150A unit. I only installed about 5 other apps on the tablet...so, the 16GB storage works for me and can still download maps for the trip to Lost Coast (including maps through Mendo NF). 

 

The 8.9" screen size is reasonably sized for viewing and ipad mini doesn't weigh a lot. And from what I've gathered reading other forums, the Gaia software runs smoother on iOS than Android. That said, you do pay a premium for ipad compared to android tablet, and you cannot add on add'l memory/storage after purchase - which you can do on most android tablets. 

 

The prices of the ipad mini's have come down, esp for wifi versions. I went with the Dual external GPS bc, like you said, it's more accurate... it'll bluetooth connect to either ipad or android. It's powered either by built-in battery or via USB. And I just velcro the gps to the dash. 

I could have gotten an ipad with GPS built-in, but that actually would have cost (very) slightly more than the wifi ipad + ext GPS. 

 

Dual GPS on amazon: https://www.amazon.c...ds=dual gps 150

 

 

Attached Files


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Chris

#5
lutz

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I mostly use my Android phone with a ram mount.For software I've been using Oruxmaps for years and works great. For state maps mapsforge and for trails California trail maps.

 

Oruxmaps 

http://www.oruxmaps.com/cs/es

 

mapsforge

http://download.maps...rth-america/us/

 

California trail maps

https://www.californiatrailmap.com/


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99 Discovery 2 -Parts truck

2008 lr3

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#6
RedRover

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Paul, 

 

I have a ipad mini 3 (wifi) 16GB RAM paired with a Dual GPS 150A unit. I only installed about 5 other apps on the tablet...so, the 16GB storage works for me and can still download maps for the trip to Lost Coast (including maps through Mendo NF). 

 

The 8.9" screen size is reasonably sized for viewing and ipad mini doesn't weigh a lot. And from what I've gathered reading other forums, the Gaia software runs smoother on iOS than Android. That said, you do pay a premium for ipad compared to android tablet, and you cannot add on add'l memory/storage after purchase - which you can do on most android tablets. 

 

The prices of the ipad mini's have come down, esp for wifi versions. I went with the Dual external GPS bc, like you said, it's more accurate... it'll bluetooth connect to either ipad or android. It's powered either by built-in battery or via USB. And I just velcro the gps to the dash. 

I could have gotten an ipad with GPS built-in, but that actually would have cost (very) slightly more than the wifi ipad + ext GPS. 

 

Dual GPS on amazon: https://www.amazon.c...ds=dual gps 150

 

 

Hey Chris;

 

So does Gaia GPS 'see' the Dual GPS module as if it were the internal GPS automatically or are there settings to go in and change?  Also curious if the Dual GPS module gives the ±ft reading so one can know how much greater the accuracy is over an internal GPS of a tablet?


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Jared (KJ6MQI)
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#7
GraemeWare

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Non-commercial GPS are only +/-10 ft at best.

Regards,

Graeme
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Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible, Tesla Model 3,
other assorted British pot metal ...


#8
RedRover

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Graeme;

 

Precisely why I asked; I haven't seen anything better than ±10 on my iPad and was wondering if maybe something changed.


Jared (KJ6MQI)
1992 Range Rover Classic - Portofino Red
2012 Range Rover HSE - Santorini Black

 


#9
astateofmike

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You know the Disco Dolls and 4xFar are both rolling their eyes......serious about navigation?  Paper maps and a compass will never break down.

 

I have survived on my Nuvi as well, mainly because I have no speedo and it serves double duty.  However, I too wish I had a better platform that was portable and good for my old eyes.  So, being that kind of lazy, I will watch and learn.


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Just enjoying my time traveling at the Speed of Adventure.


#10
DHappel

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FWIW, I once ran an iPad for my nav but when it came time to upgrade I went Android for two basic reasons.

 

First, price.  Apple products demand a serious premium.  If it's worth it to you or not is beside the point, but they are much more expensive.

 

Second, GPS (this is also price related).  iPads do not come with GPS built in unless you get the version that also has cell service.  And that costs more, both on the front end and because you then have to add the device to your mobile plan.  The non-cellular iPads 'fake' GPS via wifi signal locations and such but it's not very accurate and is completely useless in the bush.   You can work around this by using an external GPS antenna but again that's extra cost.  Additionally, and more annoying, it's more cables to wrangle in the cab and I have enough keeping my tablet and both (his and hers) phones charged.

 

I have never felt I wanted/needed an external GPS antenna for my tablet or phone when off road.  The tablet rides on the dash in both Rovers and has a pretty clear view of the sky through the windshield so signal has been good.

 

One worry about putting a tablet (or phone) directly in the windshield and then running/charging it full time is overheating - sitting under the glass in the full sun it can get too hot.  On mine, it will stop charging if it gets too hot.  It is a Samsung after all, so that's probably a good thing since I don't want to go all DreamLiner.  However I have the tablet positioned right in front of an AC vent on the LR3, so as long as the air is on it stays frosty and cool.  It's only when I leave it sitting in the truck on a hot day, say if I'm out stacking rocks or something and shut the truck down, that it stops charging.  

 

One last note regarding tablets - get the biggest you can.  It costs more up front but if you have the space for it you'll never regret it whereas you'll often find yourself trying to zoom in/out or trying to see a too-small icon while bouncing down a trail with a small screen.  I'd consider a 10" a good size.  The 7" tablets work fine sitting in your hand, but trying to read it from across the cab on a rough trail, much less actually control it.... Trust me - just go bigger if you can find the space.

 

As for actual software, Gaia has changed their operation to a subscription only service.  I still like them as well or better than anything else I've used but that's not to say others aren't decent.  We have a partnership with Gaia for NCLR members, and will be doing something with them for the National rally this summer where we will have all the event trails on the Gaia cloud for all the participants.    I don't have time right now to get into software details, but the topic started with hardware so that's where I'll leave it for now.


Edited by DHappel, 02 January 2018 - 09:43 AM.

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Don
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#11
DHappel

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You know the Disco Dolls and 4xFar are both rolling their eyes......serious about navigation?  Paper maps and a compass will never break down.

 

I have survived on my Nuvi as well, mainly because I have no speedo and it serves double duty.  However, I too wish I had a better platform that was portable and good for my old eyes.  So, being that kind of lazy, I will watch and learn.

You know, a few years ago the Navy started re-teaching the use of the sextant and watch for celestial navigation as a hedge against electronic warfare taking out the GPS system.

 

I'm told it's not that hard to master with a little practice...


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Don
'07 LR3 HSE/HD - slightly non-stock

'96 D1 - even more non-stock


#12
PaulD

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Many Thanks Team!

 

I am leaning towards the Dual Electronics or the Garmin GLO which is the same concept: a Bluetooth-enabled link to really good GPS reception. I will run it on a Samsung 10" tablet. Just would be better if there were more USB ports to hard wire everything in place. I already have a $9.95 per year Giaia subscription.

 

We'll see where this goes.

 

--Paul


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'93 LWB
2" RTE Springs, GDE w/8K winch, Disco axles, Viair, Dura-Tracs, & Asst'd grille badges

12e11964-24f6-4630-a08f-5758456bc143.jpg


#13
RedRover

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One last note regarding tablets - get the biggest you can.  It costs more up front but if you have the space for it you'll never regret it whereas you'll often find yourself trying to zoom in/out or trying to see a too-small icon while bouncing down a trail with a small screen.  I'd consider a 10" a good size.  The 7" tablets work fine sitting in your hand, but trying to read it from across the cab on a rough trail, much less actually control it.... Trust me - just go bigger if you can find the space.

 

I would agree with this; i've not used anything smaller than 9-10" and it's been a good size to both be 'big enough' to use while on trail but small enough that it isn't eating up passenger space.


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Jared (KJ6MQI)
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#14
astateofmike

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I am thinking getting a bit more modern...too much?

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Edited by astateofmike, 02 January 2018 - 02:13 PM.

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Just enjoying my time traveling at the Speed of Adventure.


#15
GraemeWare

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I am thinking getting a bit more modern...too much?

Mike,

Why would you move your steering wheel?!

Graeme

Edited by GraemeWare, 02 January 2018 - 03:35 PM.

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Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible, Tesla Model 3,
other assorted British pot metal ...


#16
astateofmike

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I have dreams of one day owning  the manual lever RHD Landie.....better?

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  • Attached File  RRC.JPG   63.33KB   4 downloads

Edited by astateofmike, 02 January 2018 - 05:00 PM.

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Just enjoying my time traveling at the Speed of Adventure.


#17
DHappel

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Many Thanks Team!
 
I am leaning towards the Dual Electronics or the Garmin GLO which is the same concept: a Bluetooth-enabled link to really good GPS reception. I will run it on a Samsung 10" tablet. Just would be better if there were more USB ports to hard wire everything in place. I already have a $9.95 per year Giaia subscription.
 
We'll see where this goes.
 
--Paul


Paul, skip the external gps reciever. Never once have I wanted one with my Samsung devices. If for some reason you do need it you can add later but I'd bet good money you'll never want for signal.
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Don
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#18
GraemeWare

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Paul, skip the external gps reciever. Never once have I wanted one with my Samsung devices. If for some reason you do need it you can add later but I'd bet good money you'll never want for signal.


I have an external GPS receiver. Never used it, but mainly because it wouldn't plug in to my map ....and I always forget to download the remote maps to my Asus tablet .... I'll have to find an 8-year-old to show me how it all works.

Regards,

Graeme
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Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible, Tesla Model 3,
other assorted British pot metal ...


#19
lithium1330

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If going with android table and one with built-in GPS chip, then no need for external GPS receiver - save your money there. 

Esp. true for overland trips where high GPS refresh rate is overkill for slow moving trucks. 


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Chris

#20
GraemeWare

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Esp. true for overland trips where high GPS refresh rate is overkill for slow moving trucks.


Speak for yourself .... my truck moves fast (downhill ...)

Graeme

Graeme Ware -- San Carlos, CA

1990 Range Rover Classic - LT230 Transfer box, Warn winch, 2" lift, 235/85-16 Dunlop MUD Rovers, "Blue Submarine"
1996 Discovery 1 (R380 Manual Transmission, Ashcroft under-drive, RoverWare rear bumper, 33x12.5-15 BFG ATs) -- we call her "Katrina" -- Fordyce 7.5 mile survivor
1999 Discovery 2 (D1 CDL Linkage, 265/75-16 BFG A/T KO, RoverWare front and rear bumper)
1993 Jaguar XJS convertible; 1971 Triumph GT6; 1959 Morris Minor convertible, Tesla Model 3,
other assorted British pot metal ...





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